Sicklemill, Haslemere

Status
Within the Conservation Area
Semi-redundant storage building, former mill (flocking). Large pond now filled and part developed as an industrial estate.
Work to be undertaken
Investigation of machinery etc.
Partial restoration of pond.
Interpretation - probably by Waverley BC
Habitat
Disturbed ground (fill) of little interest. A small area of water survives.
Ownership/Access
Owned by Waverley BC - A287 runs in front.
Comment
An impressive set of buildings. Waverley BC have a development brief which involves retention of key parts of building and removal of recent accretions. RWT has been offered space for display.
Budget
None at this stage

Shottermill

Status
Within the Conservation Area
Mill building survives, with long leat. Possible meadows. Mill buildings now builder's yard/shop/office.
Work to be undertaken
Excavation of leat inlet sluice, weir and first section of leat.
Continue investigation/clearance of leat and possible meadows. Consolidation work to sluice and leat controls.
Target: re-establish flow of water in leat.
Interpretation.
Habitat
Meadows/leat not yet surveyed.
Adjacent (National Trust) ponds are spring-fed are artificial; used by waterfowl. Wet woodlands regarded locally as important nesting site
Ownership/Access
B2131 crosses in front of mill; public footpath near leat sluice; RH bank belongs to Waverley B.C., left to Fernhurst/Linchmere PCs
Comment
An interesting site in context of a real river as a whole, Mill buildings largely converted to flats;
Leat runs through area of recreation ground in public ownership and is amenable therefore to effective interpetation.
Budget
Budget costs: for restoration work by Trust: £500

New Mill and Pitfold Mill, Critchmere

Status

Both mills demolished and ponds filled in ; some controls survive.
New Mill pond partly occupied now by sewage wroks

Work to be undertaken

Investigation and consolidation; interpretation.

Habitat

Grassland, scrub and fen with flushes. Locally disturbed ground.
Flora include Carex pendula, Equisetum sylvaticum, Lathreae clandestina.
Flora contrasts with the Hampshire length of the valley (here Atherfield clay, elsewhere generally sandstone (greensand).

Upstream of Pitfold - to be investigated.

Ownership/Access

New Mill : cul de sac and public footpath cross

river valley, Pitfold Mill (tributary) visible from road.

Comment
Little obvious remains, other than good sluices; ecologically of local interest due to contrast.
Budget

Restoration work by Trust: £500
Onsite interpretation: £100


Pophole Mill, Hammer

Status
Within the Conservation Area
Mill site (iron) late 16th century. Impressive sluices remain with dam, slag, and wheel-drive position. No Machinery or buildings survive - disused mid 18th century
Work to be undertaken
Repairs and consolidation of sluices and abutments, consolidation and stabilisation of dam at drive position.
Interpretation; re-establishment of the area of the mill pond, check upstream for meadows.
Habitat
Wet woodland with flushes. Straightening the river has left small very wet areas of fen (oxbows). Flora includes Equisetum sylvaticum, Luzula pilosa.
Adjacent steep hillside with heathland and Sphagnum spp. provides interesting contrast.
Ownership/Access
Several ownerships involved. Public footpath runs over dam; permissive access to whole area. Road crosses river valley downstream.
Comment
Key site - important remains and highly accessible
Budget

To Date : Stone for central pier in stock paid £300 paid by Waverley BC to Bramshott and Liphook Preservation Soc
Abutment repair £300

Budget for restoration work by RWT £4500
Onsite interpretation £200


Hammer Bottom

Status
Within the Conservation Area
Watermeadow: left sluice survives, right sluice completely collapsed, much of the central area reverting to wet woodland.
Hammer Trout Hatchery at downstream end, some excellent stop survivals.
Work to be undertaken
Consolidation of left sluice, clearance of carriers and consolidation of stops
Habitat
Wet woodland; fen.
Typical of meadow having reverted to alder woodland. Wettest areas (hollows) have become fen. The largest area of uninterrupted wet woodland in the valley.
Flora predominantly Impatiens glandulifera, phalaris arundinacea, sallow, and scirpus sylvaticus.
Ownership/Access
several different ownerships; Public access limited to bridleways to downstream and near the upstream end. Road runs parallel with the river but little view of the river - some good views of the valley. Access by arrangement with owners; railway runs near the river on the left bank.
Comment
ecologically sensitive with some good minor remains; poort access may be ecologically beneficial.
Budget
Restoration work by RWT £750
Onsite interpretation £100.

Lakehouse Sluice

Status
Within the Conservation Area
Watermeadow sluices (Part collapsed), carriers controls and meadows ; possible mill-site, (+ carriage drive over downstream bridleway.)
Work to be undertaken
Clearance and consolidation of sluice, controls and carriers ; investigation of meadow layout.
Archaeological investigation of possible mill-site.
Habitat
left bank: improved pasture (watermeadow)
Flora: Juncus effusus, Rumex obtusifolius right bank: wet woodland, fen - as Hammer Bottom
Flora predominatly Impatiens glanduliferao, phalaris arundinacea, sallow, and Scirpus sylvaticus
Ownership/Access
access by arrangement with landowners.
One: absentee
Bridleways cross River Valley to upstream (ancient track and bridge) and downstream. B2131 runs parallel with downstream portion.
Comment
possible site of local historic importance.
Budget
for restoration work by Trust: £1500
onsite interpretation: £100

Marshes Hollow

Status
Within the Conservation Area
Meadows ; form well preserved due to grazing (until recently) by sheep.
Work to be undertaken
investigation of system and controls consolidation where appropriate.
Bridleway overbridge at top of hill requires repair
Habitat
left bank: pasture/watermeadow, then urban right bank: grassland/fen reverting to wet woodland:process less developed than elsewhere (? due to sheep- grazing)
Flora include Sparganium erectum, Scirpus sylvaticus
Ownership/Access
access by arrangement with owner only
Bridleway crosses River Valley upstream.
Comment
good meadows : improved access unlikely
Budget
for restoration work by Trust: none at this stage
onsite interpretation: £100
for bridleway bridge: £750

Radford Park

Status
Within the Conservation Area
Watermeadows, carriers, controls, tunnel and sluices (including carrier feed to aqueduct ; downstream left + part of right) meadows tipped and filled, and river locally diverted by A3 dualling 1960s.
Right carrier largely restored and made operational by Parish Council's MSC team. Run as 'Country Park' by Parish Council, providing circular route, restored ponds and tree planting, with car parking.
Work to be undertaken
Work to be undertaken : Further investigation of upstream watermeadows ; complete clearance of downstream right sluice ; repairs to tunnel ; repairs to hatch at head of right carrier ; restoration of right sluice.
Interpretation (possibly by Bramshott P.C.
Habitat
Grassland (meadow); woodland, some wet; Landscaped recreational area, particularly on old tipped area.
Ownership/Access
Parish Council ownership - unrestricted access ; abuts A.3 downstream. Upstream left bank is gardens of housing estate ("Wey Lodge" - mid 1970s).
Comment
Capable of giving small working meadow ; lies on perimeter of Liphook : High level of management required - probably not compatible with retaining character of old meadow land.
Budget
Costs for restoration work by Trust: none at this stage
Onsite interpretation: £300

Radford Aqueduct

Status
Within the Conservation Area
Aqueduct recently restored and watermeadows with carrier, (partly tipped over)
Carriers serving aqueduct do not survive. Continues to Tunbridge
Work to be undertaken
Interpretation of aqueduct. Investigation of meadows and consolidation work where necessary
Habitat
Wet meadow
Sallow and balsam in old channels, Water crowfoot in river by aqueduct
Ownership/Access
A.3 Trunk road crosses River Valley at Radford Bridge immediately upstream from aqueduct : aqueduct is owned by Parish Council and is accessible to public.
Remainder of land (meadows) is owned by public company, but unused.
Footpath to Bramshott runs some way by right carrier.
Comment
Meadows lie on perimeter of Liphook and would form "unimproved" continuation of access provided by Radford Park.
Budget
For restoration work by Trust: consolidate controls £500 onsite interpretation: £100

Tunbridge

Status
Within the Conservation Area
Arch bridge of medieval origin : Excellent watermeadows upstream; traces downstream. (served from Radford)
Work to be undertaken
Investigation of watermeadows layout and controls (some already identified ).
Habitat
Wet meadow
Sallow, Juncus effusus and Scirpus sylvaticus in old channels.
Away from river, improved grassland has been disturbed by electrcity cable.
Ownership/Access
Tunbridge is on highway crossing River Valley ; upstream meadow freely accessible to RWT (left side : right side private garden, incorporating old meadow) ; downstream meadow accessible by arrangement only but crossed by public footpath.
Bramshott Vale : house : listed building.
Comment
Bridge is attractive survival (age of present structure not known ) ; upstream meadow appears to be one of best.
Budget
For restoration work by Trust: Consolidate Controls £500
Onsite interpretation: £100

Bramshott Mill

Status
Within the Conservation Area, and a Domesday Site
Old Cornmill substantially reconstructed 1930s. Sluices survive in good condition. Present pond is spring fed. Old ford immediately downstream now abandoned : road now crosses via causeway and bridge slightly further downstream.
Work to be undertaken
None Planned
Habitat
Garden with woodland
Ownership/Access
Difficult. Road runs parallel to River, providing some views ; footpath on other side gives view of River downstream of Mill.
Comment
A site of local historical interest
Budget
None at this stage

Bramshott Court Aqueduct

Status
Within the Conservation Area, and an Ancient Monument
Aqueduct (extant but in poor condition) with carriers and sluice (in state of collapse) narrow meadows : aqueduct/carrier could also take tributary waters (Waggoners Wells Stream).
Left carrier (via aqueduct) once fed early 20thC Water-garden at 'Waterside'. Watermeadows.
RWT has cleared aqueduct, carrier downstream and cleared and repaired tunnel ('bunny') under bridleway.
Work to be undertaken
Aqueduct to be consolidated (to be capable of carrying water) ; buttress and consolidate sluice and adjacent carrier ; repairs to carrier masonry and controls.
Interpretation.
Habitat
Right bank: wet woodland; remains of water-garden flora.
Aestivum leucojum.
Left bank: garden upstream, improved pasture downstream.
Ownership/Access
Nearest public access is bridleway crossing river (approx 200 Metres downstream form aqueduct ) access to aqueduct by arrangement with RWT . Road runs parallel to but largely screened from river.
Comment
The aqueduct is the most complete survival of its kind, taking into account the adjacent system ; it is capable ofbeing operated again.
Key site, but access limited.
Budget
Expenditure to date: £6,000
Budget costs: for completion of restoration work (incl associated controls etc) by Trust £1,000
Onsite interpretation: £100

Waterside Lake

Status
Within the Conservation Area
Lake (dammed river); limited surviving meadow traces.
Work to be undertaken
None Planned
Habitat
Improved pasture/parkland; lake with fen.
Carex paniculata, sallow and weeping willow.
Nesting swans.
Ownership/Access
Owner 'interested' but not likely to permit additional access.
Public bridleway runs parallel to river/lake - good view of 1ake.
Comment
Lake (although obliterating water-meadow in valley bottom) is a positive asset and RWT is concerned it should be maintained as such.
Budget
None at this stage

Passfield Bridge Sluice

Status
Within the Conservation Area
Watermeadow, part collapsed sluice/bridge with causeway and carriers ; watermeadows (overgrown - see Habitat but largely intact) with some controls.
All down stream from Passfield Road bridge(formerly a ford).
Sluice has been cleared by RWT ; limited clearance of carrier, drains and controls on right bank; investigation on right downstream from sluice has revealed further controls ; no controls discovered on left bank.
Work to be undertaken
Consolidation of sluice and possible reconstruction of third collapsed arch ; consolidation work to adjacent controls etc. ; further investigation and consolidation of controls etc. elsewhere in meadow.
Interpretation.
Habitat
Wet woodland; extensive fen (Carex paniculata)
A major asset.
Otter's holt
The maintenance of the water table in this area is crucial to the survival of the large colony of giant tussock sedges.
Ownership/Access
permissive access - fairly easily passable (right bank only ) to sluice, then with difficulty.
Footpath runs parallel, but generally out ofsight of the river.
Comment
A key area with good watermeadow survival, and ecologically important and unusual.
Budget
Expenditure to date: £3,000
Budget costs: for restoration work (incl controls) by Trusl £500
Onsite interpretation: £200

Passfield Mill (Bramshott Paper Mill)

Status
Within the Conservation Area; now Auriol Plastics Factory
Iron mill site (l7th Cent.) ; paper mill site, now a plastics factory ; Victorian mill buildings survive, (surrounded on 3 sides by 20th Century factory buildings).
18th Cent. Mill House. Pond larely filled in, remainder silted up.
No controls except pond sluices or machinery survives; tail stream extant.
Work to be undertaken
Some exploratory work may be justified.
Enhancement work to factory - ie. landscaping and decoration removal of any redundant buildings.
Possibly reinstatement of breached (20th Cent.) dam.
Further clearance of silted up running section of mill pond.
Interpretation.
Habitat
Dry woodland in narrow strip
Ownership/Access
Permissive access across river towards main road. (B3004).
Footpath runs alongside river.
Comment
A historically interesting site, although unattractive in its present form. Enhancement scheme desirable.
Budget
None at this stage
Onsite interpretation: £100, enhancement: £250

Hatch Farm Aqueduct

Status
Within the Conservation Area
Ruined aqueduct (abutments/springing only) and carriers. Sluices do not survive (see also Passfield Mill ); extensive watermeadows with controls.
Aqueduct has been cleared by RWT ; Sections of meadow and carrier have been identified and cleared by RWT including outlet from Mill pond.
Work to be undertaken
Work to be undertaken : Consolidation of aqueduct (+ possible provision of temporary waterway) further exploration and restoration of meadow into workable condition ; construction of sluice gates.
Interpretation.
Habitat
Left bank: wet meadow: improved pasture:
Sallow scrub, Juncus effusus, Scirpus sylvaticus and Typha latifolia along channels
Right bank: wet meadow; species rich; grazed.
50+ species including Caltha palustris, Carex acuta, ragged robin and southern marsh orchid.
Downstream of ford: wet woodland.
Ownership/Access
Ownership/access : Permissive access ; generally under RWT's guidance; public footpath parallel to river.
Comment
A key area with plenty of potential (including active use); the meadows are species rich and of interest in their own ecological right - a balanced scheme of management is to be prepared.
Budget
For restoration work by Trust: £2500
Onsite interpretation: £200

Standford Mills

Status
Within the Conservation Area
Both converted to private houses : Water controls not known at lower mill : Water is still penned at Upper mill :Some watermeadow survives between Upper and Lower Mills.
Work to be undertaken
None Planned
Habitat
Garden and Meadow
Ownership/Access
No public access ; Upper Mill may be visited by arrangement. Route past is via main road (83004) - some river visible.
Comment
Probably too much change to be of great interest (and "overshadowed" by Headley Mill). Main road route is attractive but not especially safe for walkers.
Budget
None at this stage

Headley Mill

Status
Within the Conservation Area
Historic and - until very recently - a working Cornmill, with large water area.
Work to be undertaken
Work to buildings and machinery is undertaken by owners.
Some issues with degradation of the retaining walls and support structure. Some enhancement/clearance work around pond to be undertaken by RWT.
Interpretation.
Habitat
extensive mill pond, with waterfowl
Ownership/Access
Mill adjoins main road (83004) ; the dam is crossed by a public footpath and the road crosses the tailstream via the ford.
Comment
This is one of the highlights of the Trust's area ; public access is generally good.
Budget
None at this stage
Interpretations £100

Watermeadow Farm, Lindford

Status
Some watermeadow survival ; probably fed from Headley Mill Pond. Further investigation possible.
Work to be undertaken
None immediately planned (subject to further investigation ).
Habitat
Meadow: not yet surveyed
Ownership/Access
No public access at present.
Comment
This stretch of river runs between the main road at Lindford (B3004) and Washford and would form a vital link in a Lindford-Bordon riverside route ; the watermeadow survival here would complement the sluice remains below Washford.
Budget
None at this stage

Washford Sluices

Status
Collapsed watermeadow sluices downstream from Washford. Little or no trace of meadows adjacent ; meadows downstream from confluence with Deadwater, to Lindford (Olivers Farm).
Largely unsurveyed.
Work to be undertaken
Sluice remains not inspected in detail ; sufficient probably survives to justify (partial) re-erection
Interpretation.
Habitat
Not yet surveyed
Ownership/Access
Land in public ownership Washford - Deadwater (HCC Schools, + Parish Council ) therefore through access might be arranged.
Not known further downstream.
Comment
The best remains in Whitehill/Bordon although little of the meadows survive and particularly worthwhile as good prospect here of riverside walk.
Budget
For restoration work by Trust: £500
Onsite interpretation: £100

Headley Wood Aqueduct

Status
Ancient Monument
Stone aqueduct with associated carriers ; sluices believed approximately l/4 mile upstream, but do not appear to survive. Meadows survive - overgrown in immediate vicinity of aqueduct ; fairly comprehensive survival downstream of farm, to vicinity of Park Mill.
Work to be undertaken
Aqueduct repaired late 1970s by County Council; repair not executed with ' archaeology' as principal aim. Adjacent system requires urgent clearance and consolidation.
Interpretation.
Habitat
Not yet surveyed.
Ownership/Access
Aqueduct now forms public bridleway bridge over river : immediate system only visible from bridleway. Access to other part improbable under present ownership (owner has not been specifically approached.)
Comment
Aqueduct itself can readily be interpreted. Downstream meadows are excellent survivals - probably no immediate threat, but management agreement should be contemplated (cattle or ploughing disastrous).
Budget
For restoration work by Trust £1500
Onsite interpretation: £100

Park Mill, Headley Park

Status
This is the 20th Century name, also known as "PEPPERPOT MILL".
Brick built polygonal estate commill, believed extant in 1815 now ruinous, but with good leat and water control features. The leat and controls have now been cleaned by RWT in the vicinity of the mill ; water supply (abandoned) under control of Headley Wood Estate, upstream via 1/3 mile long leat ( could probably be reinstated but no immediate prospect).
Work to be undertaken
Waterways by mill are in need of repointing following clearance. Mill building likely to be consolidated by new owner. Stone bridges over river and leat require repair.
Habitat
Right bank: woodland; overgrown millsite; plantatrion downstream
Left bark: woodland, wet in some places with areas of fen (former watermeadow)
Ownership/Access
Private ownership ; access will probably be permitted if under guidance of Trust officers.
Comment
Delightful and romantic setting and an unusual survival. Difficult to include on any through route under present circumstances.
Budget
None at this stage.

Mellow Farm

Status
Watermeadows with outstanding survivals right bank; large sluice - river in deep cut after confluence of River Slea.
Some meadows (left bank) filled.
Work to be undertaken
Consolidation of sluice: £2000
Habitat
Ownership/Access
Actively farmed; access by arrangement only. Public footpath climbs left escarpment.
Comment
A good extensive system, more reminiscent of larger-scale systems in W.Hants, Wilts improved meadow
Budget

Environmental

WATER QUALITY TESTING

Over the last couple of years we have carried out spring and autumn testing of dissolved phosphates and nitrates, at a limited number of sites, using basic ‘visual’ testing methods as part of the FreshwaterWatch campaign.

As a result, we have decided to up our game by buying some more professional kit (seen here) with a view to monitoring more regularly and more widely.
We also hope to arrange ‘kick-sampling’ training (in collaboration with Riversearch Wardening scheme run by the Surrey Wildlife Trust) which establishes how invertebrates are doing in the watercourses—another indicator of water quality.

 


Environmental

Kick Test Sampling

The presence/absence and abundance of certain freshwater invertebrates (often called macroinvertebrates) – the aquatic larval stage of various insects - can tell a story of a water body’s health. Because some invertebrates are more sensitive to pollutants than others, we can use them as “indicator species”.
Assessing the types of invertebrates found indicates something about the health of the water body they have been found in. For example worms can tolerate high levels of pollutants but some mayflies don’t tolerate even low levels of pollution. They also help describe when pollution events occur because some populations take a while to recover if they have been harmed by pollution.

The Trust is working with Frensham Fly Fishers who have a long-established routine of regular sampling, and we will be working with them to extend the scope of sampling in our branch of the river, combining findings and understanding how and where the river environment and water quality is being impacted.
This supports the Riversearch Wardening scheme run by the Surrey Wildlife Trust.

A brief video from the Field Studies Council showing Kick Sampling at work


Environmental

Flow Monitoring

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Information and Outreach

Revision to the Southern Wey Guide

The guide was originally drafted and published as a booklet in 1984. Whilst the 'hardcopy' versions have been out of print for some while, an electronic version of that edition is available either as CD or a PDF file.

Whilst the landscape, geomorphology and archeology have not altered much in the 35+ years since writing (!), there have been a number of changes; the building of the A3 bypass, industrial and housing developments, changes to land use, and impact on the ecology as non-native species further influence the environment.

The updated version of the guide will continue to be electronic in format - available as an 'e-book' rather than a computer file, allowing future amendment and updates to be readily applied and available. We aim to have this publication completed by mid 2020, and will be advertising availability.


Information and Outreach

Route Plans for walkers.

Access to our part of the river is not well documented, though there are some public footpaths and bridleways which follow part of the course. The Trust will be documenting some of the walks using a variety of means - information boards and route markers where practical, locally available route guides either as sheets or small booklets, and using ViewRanger - an online application widely used by the walking community to find and follow new routes.

As ever, suggestions and input to any of the routes, notes on the points of interest or guidance would be most welcome and will be incorporated in our guides.


Information and Outreach

Pathway and riverside Information Boards

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Information and Outreach

School Support Activities

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Information and Outreach

Augmented Reality Sandbox

First seen at the Trust's Annual Picnic in 2017, the AR Sandbox has seen a considerable amount of use, visiting schools, conferences, festivals and other events - 2019 saw us at 38 events over the year, with well over 2000 'participants'. As well as publicising the Trust, the sandbox visits have resulted in a number of donations received which support the ongoing work and outreach programme.

To further the use of the equipment, we are developing a series of 'lesson plans' for schools, and potential use ideas for the sandbox. These are being added to the resources section of the website, so any concepts, ideas or suggestions would be most welcome as we augment the reality a little further!


Information and Outreach

Speakers Programme

The Current list of activities is on the Events page . A programme of topics will be available here shortly.

Information and Outreach

Led Walks and Excursions

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Information and Outreach

Volunteer Activities

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The River Wey Trust: F